Linux Journal

Removing Duplicate PATH Entries, Part II: the Rise of Perl

3 months 2 weeks ago
by Mitch Frazier

 

With apologies to Arnold and the Terminator franchise for the title, let's look one more time at removing duplicates from the PATH variable. This take on doing it was prompted by a comment from a reader named Shaun on the previous post that asked "if you're willing to use a non-bash solution (AWK) to solve the problem, why not use Perl?" Shaun was kind enough to provide a Perl version of the code, which was good, since I'd have been hard-pressed to come up with one. It's a short piece of code, shorter than the AWK version, so it seemed like it ought to be fairly easy to pick it apart. In the end, I'm not sure I'd call it easy, but it was interesting, and I thought other non-Perl programmers might find it interesting too.

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Mitch Frazier

NVIDIA Open-Sourcing PhysX, miniNodes Launching a Raspberry Pi 3 CoM Carrier Board, Linux Mint 19.1 Beta Now Available, Linux Kernel 4.20-rc5 Released and New F-Bomb Fixing Patch for Kernel

3 months 2 weeks ago

News briefs for December 3, 2018.

NVIDIA is open-sourcing its PhysX physics simulation engine. According to Phoronix, NVIDIA says ""We're doing this because physics simulation—long key to immersive games and entertainment—turns out to be more important than we ever thought. Physics simulation dovetails with AI, robotics and computer vision, self-driving vehicles, and high-performance computing." See also the NVIDIA blog for more details.

miniNodes is launching a new Raspberry Pi 3 CoM carrier board that will allow developers to create mini ARM clusters. ZDNet reports that the board has slots for five RPi 3s in order to "bring extreme edge compute capacity' to cramped spaces, industrial IoT applications, and remote villages". It also can be used " on the desktop for learning about compute clustering, Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, or development using Python, Arm, and Linux". The carrier board is available now for pre-order for $259 from miniNodes.

Linux Mint 19.1 beta is now available. This version features a new desktop layout and many other improvements. You can download it from here. Note that this is a beta version for testing and shouldn't be considered stable. (Source: OMG! Ubuntu!.)

Linux kernel 4.20-rc5 is out. Linus wrote "So it all looks a bit odd, although none of it is hugely _alarming_. One of the reasons the arch side is a bit bigger than usual at this stage is that we got the STIPB performance regression sorted out, for example." In addition, he addressed the timing of the final 4.20 release: "So my current suggestion is that we plan on a Christmas release, everybody gets their pull requests for the next merge window done *before* the holidays, and then we see what happens. I think we all want to have a calm holiday season without either the stress of a merge window _or_ the stress of prepping for one." (See the LKML for the full message.)

ZDNet reports that Jarkko Sakkinen, a kernel contributor from Intel, "has released a set of patches that conceal some of the f-bombs that Linux kernel developers have added to kernel code comments over the years." The patch set "addresses 15 components where 'fuck' or 'fucking' appeared in code comments, which have now been swapped out for a 'hugload of hugs'."

NVIDIA Raspberry Pi Linux Mint kernel Code of Conduct
Jill Franklin

Open Science Means Open Source--Or, at Least, It Should

3 months 2 weeks ago
by Glyn Moody

Why open source was actually invented in 1665.

When did open source begin? In February 1998, when the term was coined by Christine Peterson? Or in 1989, when Richard Stallman drew up the "subroutinized" GNU GPL? Or perhaps a little earlier, in 1985, when he created the GNU Emacs license? How about on March 6, 1665? On that day, the following paragraph appeared:

Whereas there is nothing more necessary for promoting the improvement of Philosophical Matters, than the communicating to such, as apply their Studies and Endeavours that way, such things as are discovered or put in practise by others; it is therefore thought fit to employ the Press, as the most proper way to gratifie those, whose engagement in such Studies, and delight in the advancement of Learning and profitable Discoveries, doth entitle them to the knowledge of what this Kingdom, or other parts of the World, do, from time to time, afford, as well of the progress of the Studies, Labours, and attempts of the Curious and learned in things of this kind, as of their compleat Discoveries and performances: To the end, that such Productions being clearly and truly communicated, desires after solid and usefull knowledge may be further entertained, ingenious Endeavours and Undertakings cherished, and those, addicted to and conversant in such matters, may be invited and encouraged to search, try, and find out new things, impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving Natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences.

Those words are to be found in the very first issue of the Royal Society's Philosophical Transactions, the oldest scientific journal in continuous publication in the world, which published key results by Newton and others. Just as important is the fact that it established key principles of science that we take for granted today, including the routine public sharing of techniques and results so that others can build on them—open source, in other words.

Given that science pretty much invented what we now call the open-source approach, it's rather ironic that the scientific community is currently re-discovering openness, in what is known as open science. The movement is being driven by a growing awareness that the passage from traditional, analog scientific methods, to ones permeated by digital technology, is no minor evolution. Instead, it brings fundamental changes to how science can—and should—be conducted.

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Glyn Moody

Linux Laptop Buyer's Guide

3 months 3 weeks ago
by Carlie Fairchild

We've tested the most promising laptops pre-installed with Linux, and featured reviews of them in our 2018 Linux Laptop Buyer's Guide. Download your copy now to read what you need to know when shopping for your next Linux laptop. 

In this special issue we review the:

  • Chromebook  
  • Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition
  • Librem 13v2 
  • System76 Oryx 

We hope you enjoy!

PDF Download Link: https://www.linuxjournal.com/2018-buyers-guide

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Carlie Fairchild