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3 scary sysadmin stories

2 months 3 weeks ago

opensource.com: Terrifying ghosts are hanging around every data center, just waiting to haunt the unsuspecting sysadmin.

Changing Up Your Linux Distro

2 months 3 weeks ago
It's common for Linux users to hop between distributions and survey the field, and I recently reached a point where I had to seriously rethink the one I was using most of the time. Between hardware compatibility issues with my old standby and some discouraging missteps with other go-to choices, I felt the time had come to reassess my pool of preferred distributions and repopulate it from scratch.
Jonathan Terrasi

Fedora 29 Officially Released, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 Launched, New Version of Linux Lite, Google AI Tracking Humpback Whale Songs, and Resin.io Announces openBalena and a Name Change

2 months 3 weeks ago

News briefs for October 31, 2018.

The Fedora Project Manager announced the official release of Fedora 29 yesterday. This release is the first to include the Fedora Modularity feature across all variants. Other changes include "GNOME 3.30 on the desktop, ZRAM for our ARM images, and a Vagrant image for Fedora Scientific". You can download it from here.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 launched yesterday with improved security. eWeek reports that the new release features "TPM 2.0 support for security authentication, as well as integrating the open source nftables firewall technology effort". eWeek quotes principal project manager Steve Almy: "The TPM 2.0 integration in 7.6 provides an additional level of security by tying the hands-off decryption to server hardware in addition to the network bound disk encryption (NBDE) capability, which operates across the hybrid cloud footprint from on-premise servers to public cloud deployments." Version 7.6 is the second major milestone release of 2018.

Linux Lite 4.2 Final is now available. Linux Lite creator Jerry Bezencon says the release is "a 'refinement' and not a 'major upgrade'. There are some new wallpapers thanks to @whateverthing and some minor tweaks here and there." One change with this version is the addition of Redshift, which "adjusts the color temperature according to the position of the sun".

Google and a group of cetologists have been using AI to listen to years of undersea recordings with the hope of creating "a machine learning model that can spot humpback whale calls". According to TechCrunch, the project is part of Google's AI for Social Good initiative.

Resin.io, a container-based server platform for Linux device management, has "changed its name to balena and released an open source version of its IoT fleet management platform for Linux devices called openBalena", Linux Gizmos reports. Founder and CEO of the company says the name change is due to "to trademark issues, to cannabis references, and to people mishearing it as 'raisin'". balenaOS is "an open source spinoff of the container-based device software that works with balenaCloud", and the new openBalena "is an open version of the balenaCloud server software. Customers can now choose between letting balena manage their fleet of devices or building their own openBalena based server platform that manages fleets of devices running balenaOS".

News Fedora Red Hat Linux Lite Google AI Machine Learning Containers
Jill Franklin

Episode 5: Linux is Personal

2 months 3 weeks ago
Your browser does not support the audio element. Reality2.0 - Episode 5: Linux is Personal

Doc Searls and Katherine Druckman talk to Corbin Champion about Userland, an easy way to run Linux on your Android device, and other new projects.

Doc Searls

$34B Red Hat Acquisition Is a Bolt Out of Big Blue

2 months 3 weeks ago
The cloud computing landscape may look much different to enterprise users following the announcement earlier this week of IBM's agreement to acquire Red Hat. IBM plans to purchase Red Hat, a major provider of open source cloud software, for $34 billion. IBM will acquire all of the issued and outstanding common shares of Red Hat for $190 per share in cash, under terms of the deal.
Jack M. Germain

CloudWatch Is of the Devil, but I Must Use It

2 months 3 weeks ago
by Corey Quinn

Let's talk about Amazon CloudWatch.

For those fortunate enough to not be stuck in the weeds of Amazon Web Services (AWS), CloudWatch is, and I quote from the official AWS description, "a monitoring and management service built for developers, system operators, site reliability engineers (SRE), and IT managers." This is all well and good, except for the part where there isn't a single named constituency who enjoys working with the product. Allow me to dispense some monitoring heresy.

Better, let me describe this in the context of the 14 Amazon Leadership Principles that reportedly guide every decision Amazon makes. When you take a hard look at CloudWatch's complete failure across all 14 Leadership Principles, you wonder how this product ever made it out the door in its current state.

"Frugality"

I'll start with billing. Normally left for the tail end of articles like this, the CloudWatch billing paradigm is so terrible, I'm leading with it instead. You get billed per metric, per month. You get billed per thousand metrics you request to view via the API. You get billed per dashboard per month. You get billed per alarm per month. You get charged for logs based upon data volume ingested, data volume stored and "vended logs" that get published natively by AWS services on behalf of the customer. And, you get billed per custom event. All of this can be summed up best as "nobody on the planet understands how your CloudWatch metrics and logs get billed", and it leads to scenarios where monitoring vendors can inadvertently cost you thousands of dollars by polling CloudWatch too frequently. When the AWS charges are larger than what you're paying your monitoring vendor, it's not a wonderful feeling.

"Invent and Simplify"

CloudWatch Logs, CloudWatch Events, Custom Metrics, Vended Logs and Custom Dashboards all mean different things internally to CloudWatch from what you'd expect, compared to metrics solutions that actually make some fathomable level of sense. There are, thus, multiple services that do very different things, all operating under the "CloudWatch" moniker. For example, it's not particularly intuitive to most people that scheduling a Lambda function to invoke once an hour requires a custom CloudWatch Event. It feels overly complicated, incredibly confusing, and very quickly, you find yourself in a situation where you're having to build complex relationships to monitor things that are themselves far simpler.

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Corey Quinn