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New Version of KStars, Google Launches Edge TPU and Cloud IoT Edge, Lower Saxony to Migrate from Linux to Windows, GCC 8.2 Now Available and VMware Announces VMworld 2018

1 month 4 weeks ago

News briefs for July 26, 2018.

A new version of KStars—the free, open-source, cross-platform astronomy software—was released today. Version 2.9.7 includes new features, such as improvements to the polar alignment assistant and support for Ekos Live, as well as stability fixes. See the release notes for all the changes.

Google yesterday announced two new products: Edge TPU, a new "ASIC chip designed to run TensorFlow Lite ML models at the edge", and Cloud IoT Edge, which is "a software stack that extends Google Cloud's powerful AI capability to gateways and connected devices". Google states that "By running on-device machine learning models, Cloud IoT Edge with Edge TPU provides significantly faster predictions for critical IoT applications than general-purpose IoT gateways—all while ensuring data privacy and confidentiality."

The state of Lower Saxony in Germany is set to migrate away from Linux and back to Windows, following Munich's similar decision, ZDNet reports. The state currently has 13,000 workstations running openSUSE that it plans to migrate to "a current version of Windows" because "many of its field workers and telephone support services already use Windows, so standardisation makes sense". It's unclear how many years this migration will take.

GCC 8.2 was released today. This release is a bug-fix release and contains "important fixes for regressions and serious bugs in GCC 8.1 with more than 99 bugs fixed since the previous release", according to Jakub Jelinek's release statement. You can download GCC 8.2 here.

VMware announces VMworld 2018, which will be held August 26–30 in Las Vegas. The theme for the conference is "Possible Begins with You", and the event will feature keynotes by industry leaders, user-driven panels, certification training and labs. Topics will include "Data Center and Cloud, Networking and Security, Digital Workspace, Leading Digital Transformation, and Next-Gen Trends including the Internet of Things, Network Functions Virtualization and DevOps". For more information and to register, go here.

News KDE Astronomy Science Google IOT Cloud Windows openSUSE GCC VMware
Jill Franklin

Progress with Your Image

1 month 4 weeks ago
by Kyle Rankin

Learn a few different ways to get a progress bar for your dd command.

The dd tool has been a critical component on the Linux (and UNIX) command line for ages. You know a command-line tool is important if it has only two letters, and dd is no exception. What I love about it in particular is that it truly embodies the sense of a powerful tool with no safety features, as described in Neal Stephenson's In the Beginning was the Command Line. The dd command does something simple: it takes input from one file and outputs it to another file, and since in UNIX "everything is a file", that means dd doesn't care if the output file is another file on your disk, a partition or even your active hard drive, it happily will overwrite it! Because of this, dd fits in that immortal category of sysadmin tools that I type out and then pause for five to ten seconds, examining the command, before I press Enter.

Unfortunately, dd has fallen out of favor lately, and some distributions even will advise using tools like cp or a graphical tool to image drives. This is largely out of the concern that dd doesn't wait for the disk to sync before it exits, so even if it thinks it's done writing, that doesn't mean all of the data is on the output file, particularly if it's over slow I/O like in the case of USB flash storage. The other reason people have tended to use other imaging tools is that traditionally dd doesn't output any progress. You type the command, and then if the image is large, you just wait, wait and then wait some more, wondering if dd will ever complete.

But, it turns out that there are quite a few different ways to get progress output from dd, so I cover a few popular ones here, all based on the following dd command to image an ISO file to a disk:

$ sudo dd if=/some/file.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=1M Option 1: Use pv

Like many command-line tools, dd can accept input from a pipe and output to a pipe. This means if you had a tool that could measure the data flowing over a pipe, you could sandwich it in between two different dd commands and get live progress output. The pv (pipe viewer) command-line tool is just such a tool, so one approach is to install pv using your distribution's packaging tool and then create a pv and dd sandwich:

Go to Full Article
Kyle Rankin

FreeOffice Suite Is Almost Blue Ribbon-Worthy

1 month 4 weeks ago
SoftMaker's FreeOffice 2018 Linux office suite is a high-end product that provides performance and compatibility with Microsoft Office and other office suites. FreeOffice 2018 is a free version that is nearly identical to the features and UI of Softmaker's commercial flagship office suite, SoftMaker Office 2018. The FreeOffice 2018 suite is a capable alternative to its commercial upgrade.
Jack M. Germain

Red Hat's "Road to A.I." Film, Google Chrome Marks HTTP Connections Not Secure, BlueData Launches BlueK8s Project, Linux Bots Account for 95% of DDoS Attacks and Tron Buys BitTorrent

1 month 4 weeks ago

News briefs for July 25, 2018.

Red Hat's Road to A.I. film has been chosen as an entry in the 19th Annual Real to Reel International Film Festival. According to the Red Hat blog post, this "documentary film looks at the current state of the emerging autonomous vehicle industry, how it is shaping the future of public transportation, why it is a best use case for advancing artificial intelligence and how open source can fill the gap between the present and the future of autonomy." The Road to A.I. is the fourth in Red Hat's Open Source Stories series, and you can view it here.

Google officially has begun marking HTTP connections as not secure for all Chrome users, as it promised in a security announcement two years ago. The goal is eventually "to make it so that the only markings you see in Chrome are when a site is not secure, and the default unmarked state is secure". Also, beginning in October 2018, Chrome will start showing a red "not secure" warning when users enter data on HTTP pages.

BlueData launched the BlueK8s project, which is an "open source project that seeks to make it easier to deploy big data and artificial intelligence (AI) application workloads on top of Kubernetes", Container Journal reports. The BlueK8s "project is based on container technologies the company developed originally to accelerate the deployment of big data based on Hadoop and Apache Spark software".

According to the latest Kaspersky Lab report, Linux bots now account for 95% of all DDoS attacks. A post on Beta News reports that these attacks are based on some rather old vulnerabilities, such as one in the Universal Plug-and-Play protocol, which has been around since 2001, and one in the CHARGEN protocol, which was first described in 1983. See also the Kaspersky Lab blog for more Q2 security news.

BitTorrent has been bought by Tron, a blockchain startup, for "around $126 million in cash". According to the story on Engadget, Tron's founder Justin Sun says that this deal now makes his company the "largest decentralized Internet ecosystem in the world."

News Red Hat AI open source Google Chrome Security Blockchain
Jill Franklin