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RHEL for ARM Now Supported on AWS, Malicious Code Discovered in JavaScript Library to Steal Cryptocurrency, Red Hat Purchases NooBaa, Users Reporting EXT4 Filesystem Corruption Issues with Linux 4.19 and Rust's 2018 Survey

2 weeks 5 days ago

News briefs for November 28, 2018.

AWS announced Amazon EC2 A1 instances this week, the first AWS instances based on Arm architecture. And, yesterday Red Hat announced that Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM AMIs are now available for Amazon EC2 A1: "this means that customers seeking to use a multi-architecture approach across the hybrid cloud can use the world's leading enterprise Linux platform to fuel their mission-critical workloads, even on Arm instances in AWS Cloud." Red Hat plans to make Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta for ARM accessible soon as well.

Malicious code that infected the Event-stream JavaScript library to steal cryptocurrency from digital wallets was discovered recently. FossBytes reports that the researchers investigating the code found that the "targets are libraries linked to Copay Bitcoin wallet app that is available for mobile as well as desktop users. The harmful code steals the coins in the Copay wallet and then tries to connect to copayapi.host with 111.90.151.134 IP address located in Malaysia." However, an updated version without the malicious code was posted about two months ago.

Red Hat purchases NooBaa, a hybrid-cloud, data-storage company. According to ZDNet, NooBaa provides "multi-cloud storage management, which enables allows you to manage, deploy, and migrate data storage across private and major public clouds. This includes Alibaba, AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud."

Users are reporting EXT4 filesystem corruption problems with Linux 4.19. According to Phoronix, "There was initially some belief it could have been due to the multi-queue block code (BLK MQ) code in Linux 4.19, but that appears to be ruled out. Unfortunately, EXT4 file-system maintainer Ted Ts'o has been unable to reproduce this corruption issue on his own hardware."

The Rust Team's 2018 Survey is now available. The survey shows a steady stream of new users to the Rust programming language (~23% started using it in the past three months) and also that 40% of users felt productive in Rust with less than one month of use. Python ranks number one as the language users are most familiar with. See the Rust 2018 Survey for all the results.

News Red Hat AWS Cloud JavaScript Cryptocurrency Security kernel EXT4 Rust Programming
Jill Franklin

Everything You Need to Know about Containers, Part III: Orchestration with Kubernetes

2 weeks 5 days ago
by Petros Koutoupis

A look at using Kubernetes to create, deploy and manage thousands of container images.

If you've read the first two articles in this series, you now should be familiar with Linux kernel control groups (Part I), Linux Containers and Docker (Part II). But, here's a quick recap: once upon a time, data-center administrators deployed entire operating systems, occupying entire hardware servers to host a few applications each. This was a lot of overhead with a lot to manage. Now scale that across multiple server hosts, and it increasingly became more difficult to maintain. This was a problem—a problem that wasn't easily solved. It would take time for technological evolution to reach the moment where you are able to shrink the operating system and launch these varied applications as microservices hosted across multiple containers on the same physical machine.

In the final part of this series, I explore the method most people use to create, deploy and manage containers. The concept is typically referred to as container orchestration. If I were to focus on Docker, on its own, the technology is extremely simple to use, and running a few images simultaneously is also just as easy. Now, scale that out to hundreds, if not thousands, of images. How do you manage that? Eventually, you need to step back and rely on one of the few orchestration frameworks specifically designed to handle this problem. Enter Kubernetes.

Kubernetes

Kubernetes, or k8s (k + eight characters), originally was developed by Google. It's an open-source platform aiming to automate container operations: "deployment, scaling and operations of application containers across clusters of hosts". Google was an early adopter and contributor to the Linux Container technology (in fact, Linux Containers power Google's very own cloud services). Kubernetes eliminates all of the manual processes involved in the deployment and scaling of containerized applications. It's capable of clustering together groups of servers hosting Linux Containers while also allowing administrators to manage those clusters easily and efficiently.

Kubernetes makes it possible to respond to consumer demands quickly by deploying your applications within a timely manner, scaling those same applications with ease and seamlessly rolling out new features, all while limiting hardware resource consumption. It's extremely modular and can be hooked into by other applications or frameworks easily. It also provides additional self-healing services, including auto-placement, auto-replication and auto-restart of containers.

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Petros Koutoupis

Episode 8: Nostalgia, Security, and Shawn

2 weeks 5 days ago
Doc Searls