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KDE and Necuno Solutions Partner on the Open-Source Necuno Mobile, Fedora 27 Reaches End of Life, Artifact for Linux Now Available, Linux Goes to Mars and BlackArch Linux New Release

2 weeks 3 days ago

News briefs for November 30, 2018.

KDE and Necuno Solutions are partnering to offer Plasma Mobile on the Necuno Mobile, which is a device Necuno describes as "a truly open source hardware platform". From the KDE blog post: "With a focus on openness, security and privacy, the Necuno Mobile is built around an ARM Cortex-A9 NXP i.MX6 Quad and a Vivante GPU. According to Necuno, none of the closed firmware has access to the memory."

Fedora 27 has officially reached End of Life status, and its repositories will no longer receive security or bugfix updates. If you are still running Fedora 27, you should update now to Fedora 28 or 29.

The Artifact card game from Valve has officially been released for Linux. GamingOnLinux reports that this "exciting and addictive card game" is the "first Valve game to arrive with Linux support at release".

The CubeSat satellites that confirmed the successful landing of the Mars Insight lander on Mars earlier this week contained Gumxtix's Linux-driven Overo IronStorm-Y module and Caspa VL camera. According to Linux Gizmos, "the Mars Cube One (MarCO) satellites are the first CubeSats to have traveled beyond low Earth orbit. They also likely represent the farthest distance a Linux computer has traveled into space."

BlackArch Linux, the Penetration Testing Distribution, has just released new ISOs and OVA images. This release adds more than 150 new tools, includes a new version of installer and kernel 4.19.4. See the BlackArch Linux blog for the complete ChangeLog and download links.

News KDE Necuno Mobile Fedora gaming Embedded Gumstix Space BlackArch Linux Distributions Security
Jill Franklin

The High-Performance Computing Issue

2 weeks 3 days ago
by Bryan Lunduke

Since the dawn of computing, hardware engineers have had one goal that's stood out above all the rest: speed.

Sure, computers have many other important qualities (size, power consumption, price and so on), but nothing captures our attention like the never-ending quest for faster hardware (and software to power it). Faster drives. Faster RAM. Faster processors. Speed, speed and more speed. [Insert manly grunting sounds here.]

What's the first thing that happens when a new CPU is released? Benchmarks to compare it against the last batch of processors.

What happens when a graphics card is unveiled? Reviewers quickly load up whatever the most graphically demanding video game is and see just how it stacks up to the competition in frame-rate and resolution. Power and speed captures the attention of everyone from software engineers to gamers alike.

Nowhere is this never-ending quest for speed more apparent than in the high-performance computing (HPC) space. Built to handle some of the most computationally demanding work ever conceived by man, these supercomputers are growing faster by the day—and Linux is right there, powering just about all of them.

In this issue of Linux Journal, we take a stroll through the history of supercomputers, from its beginnings (long before Linux was a gleam in Linus Torvalds' eye...heck, long before Linus Torvalds was gleam in his parents' eyes) all the way to the present day where Linux absolutely dominates the Supercomputer and HPC world.

Then we take a deep dive into one of the most critical components of computing (affecting both desktop and supercomputers alike): storage.

Petros Koutoupis, Senior Platform Architect on IBM's Cloud Object Storage, creator of RapidDisk (Linux kernel modules for RAM drives and caching) and LJ Editor at Large, gives an overview of the history of computer storage leading up to the current, ultra-fast SSD and NVMe drives.

Once you're up to speed (see what I did there?) on NVMe storage, Petros then gives a detailed—step-by-step—walk-through of how to best utilize NVMe drives with Linux, including how to set up your system to have remote access to NVMe resources over a network, which is just plain cool.

Taking a break from talking about the fastest computers the Universe has ever known, let's turn our attention to a task that almost every single one of us tackles at least occasionally.

Photography.

Professional photographer Carlos Echenique provides an answer to the age-old question: is it possible for a professional photographer to use a FOSS-based workflow? (Spoiler: the answer is yes.)

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Bryan Lunduke

Auto-Download Linux Journal Each Month

2 weeks 3 days ago
by Mitch Frazier

There's an old saying, "anything worth doing, is worth automating"—or something like that. Downloading and reading Linux Journal always has been worth doing, and now you can automate it with our new autolj script, which you can get here.

Follow these few simple steps, and you can be downloading the PDF (or the .epub or the .mobi file) with the greatest of ease each month:

1) First download the script and save it somewhere; ~/bin is a good choice. You can name it whatever you like; it doesn't need to be called autolj.sh.

2) Open a terminal/shell and execute the following commands:

$ chmod +x ~/bin/autolj.sh $ ~/bin/autolj.sh --init Enter the email and zip/postal code associated with your Linux Journal subscription EMail: you@example.com # Enter your email address Zip : 88888 # Enter your zip/postal code Creating initial config file. Change your preferences in '/home/YOU/.config/autolj.cfg'. Sample crontab configuration is in '/home/YOU/.config/autolj.crontab'.

If you want to run the script from cron automatically each month, you can do this:

$ cp /home/YOU/.config/autolj.crontab mycrontab $ crontab -l >>mycrontab $ crontab

When you first run the script, use the --init command-line option to initialize the configuration file for the script. It will prompt for the email and zip/postal code associated with your Linux Journal subscription.

It saves that information in a file named ~/.config/autolj.cfg (if you saved the script with a different name, the base name of the config file will match the name that you saved the script under).

You can edit the configuration file with any text editor that you have on hand, or you can rerun the script with the --init option to re-create the config file (any existing changes that you've made will be lost).

The config file is a bash script that is sourced by the autolj script, so maintain valid bash syntax in the file. The config file contains a few other options that you may also want to change (the default value for each is shown):

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Mitch Frazier