Aggregator

RHEL 7.7 Beta Is Now Available, Kdenlive 19.04.2 Is Out, Vampire: The Masquerade - Coteries of New York to Support Linux, IceWM 1.5.5 Released and the Document Foundation Announces New "What Can I Do for LibreOffice" Website

2 weeks 4 days ago

News briefs for June 7, 2019.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 beta is now available. This version is the final release in the Full Support Phase of RHEL 7 and includes many enhancements and bug fixes. Updates include support for the latest generation of enterprise hardware and remediation for the Microarchitectural Data Sampling (MDS)/ZombieLoad vulnerabilities. See the release notes for more details.

Kdenlive version 19.04.2 is out. Highlights of this release include 77 bug fixes as well as "fixes for compositing issues, misbehaving guides/markers and grouping inconsistencies". You can get the AppImage here.

Vampire: The Masquerade - Coteries of New York will support Linux. GamingOnLinux quotes developer Draw Distance who says the game will be a "unique, atmospheric, single-player narrative experience, set in a rich, fully licensed, globally recognized universe of Vampire: The Masquerade 5th Edition". It's scheduled to be released on Steam in Q4 2019.

IceWM 1.5.5 has been released. This version of the window manager contains many bug fixes and portability fixes. Other improvements include updated translations, new manual pages and updated documentation, new quickswitch, new hotkeys, new focus behavior and much more. See the GitHub page for more details.

The Document Foundation announces a new website, "What can I do for LibreOffice". From the announcement: "In 'What can I do for LibreOffice', visitors are asked what they're interested in, and pointed to resources to get started. So instead of large web pages with walls of text, visitors can click around and find something that catches their eyes. The website source is on Gerrit if anyone has suggestions for updates or additions, and the site can be translated too."

News Red Hat RHEL Kdenlive gaming IceWM LibreOffice
Jill Franklin

Digital Will, Part I: Requirements

2 weeks 4 days ago
by Kyle Rankin

Digital assets are becoming as important as physical assets, so how do you manage them after you die?

When you lose a member of your family, you may find yourself at some point thinking about your own mortality, which then may lead you to think through preparations for your own death. I lost my father recently, but years before his death, he set up a will that described how to manage his estate, but he also made sure to share with me login details for his important financial accounts so I would have access when the time came. When the time did come to put his plans into practice, those details were invaluable.

All of this made me realize just how complicated it would be for someone to manage my own accounts in the event of my death, especially considering how much effort I've gone through to secure my computers and accounts. After all, unlike my dad, I don't use the same password for everything. What I realized I needed was the equivalent of a digital will: instructions and credentials so my next of kin had everything they needed to access my accounts and manage my affairs. In this first article of what will be a two-part series, I describe the requirements and plans to create a digital will in a way that would be manageable for my next of kin while also not negatively affecting the security of my accounts. The second part of the article will describe how I implemented these plans.

Defining Terms

This digital will is based on many of the ideas behind a traditional will, and I intend on borrowing a lot of the framework and terms instead of "re-inventing the will". To get started, let me define a few terms, but I should make it clear that I'm not an attorney, so these are just loose definitions to describe how some common terms used in a will might be applied to this digital will:

Go to Full Article
Kyle Rankin

MX Linux Reinvents Computer Use

2 weeks 5 days ago
MX Linux is a blend of mostly old and some new things, resulting in an appealing midweight Linux OS. The midweight category is a bit unusual. Desktop environments that run well on minimal hardware typically fall into the lightweight category. Lightweight environments like Xfce, LXDE/LXQt, Enlightenment and iceWM often are paired with software applications that do not tax system resources.
Jack M. Germain

Linux Which Command

2 weeks 5 days ago

Linuxize: Linux which command is used to identify the location of a given executable that is executed when you type the executable name (command) in the terminal prompt.

Zorin OS 15 Released, Canonical Issues Security Updates for All Supported Versions of Ubuntu Linux, New RCE Vulnerability Discovered Affecting Email Servers, Khadas VIM3 Launching Soon and Krita's Digital Atelier on Sale

2 weeks 5 days ago

News briefs for June 6, 2019.

Zorin OS 15 has been released. From the announcement for this new major version: "Every aspect of the user experience has been re-considered and refined in this new release, from how apps are installed, to how you get work done, to how it interacts with the devices around you. The result is a desktop experience that combines the most powerful desktop technology with the most user-friendly design." Go here to download.

Canonical yesterday released important security updates for all supported versions of Ubuntu Linux. Update immediately if you haven't done so already. According to Softpedia News, "If you're using Ubuntu, you must update the kernel as soon as possible to patch these security issues. The new Linux kernel versions are linux-image 5.0.0-16.17 for Ubuntu 19.04, linux-image 4.18.0-21.22 for Ubuntu 18.10, linux-image 4.15.0-51.55 for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, linux-image 4.4.0-150.176 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, linux-image 4.18.0-21.22~18.04.1 for Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS, and linux-image 4.15.0-51.55~16.04.1 for Ubuntu 16.04.6 LTS."

A new RCE (remote command execution) vulnerability is affecting almost half of the internet's email servers. ZDNet reports that the Qualys security firm "found a very dangerous vulnerability in Exim installations running versions 4.87 to 4.91. The vulnerability is described as a remote command execution—different, but just as dangerous as a remote code execution flaw—that lets a local or remote attacker run commands on the Exim server as root."

The Khadas VIM3, an Amlogic S922X-powered Raspberry Pi-competitor, is launching on June 24. According to Notebook Check, the Khadas VIM3 will run Android 9.0 Pie, LibreELEC or Ubuntu. The company will initially launch two boards, the Basic and Pro, for $69.99 and $99.99, respectively. In addition, "Khadas has also integrated a neural processing unit (NPU), which it claims can process up to 2.5 tera operations per second (TOPS). The company has revealed the back of the board too, which houses the microSD card slot, MIPI CSI camera connector, along with the MIPI DSI and TP connectors for linking the VIM3 with an external monitor."

To celebrate its new release, Krita is offering "a 50% off sale of Digital Atelier, Ramon Miranda's painterly brushes and tutorials pack for the rest of this month!" Digital Atelier includes more than 50 new brush presets, more than 30 new brush tips, new patterns and surfaces, and almost two hours of video tutorial. You can get Digital Atelier in the Krita shop.

News Zorin OS Canonical Ubuntu Security SBCs Khadas Krita
Jill Franklin