Aggregator

Qt 5.12 LTS Beta Released, Yabits Now Available, Manjaro-Illyria and New Bladebook Coming Soon, First DNSSEC Rollover Next Week and Secret Text Adventure Game Found on Google.com

1 week 6 days ago

News briefs for October 5, 2018.

Qt 5.12 LTS beta was released this morning. Qt 5.12 will be a long-term supported release, and it'll be supported for three years. Improved performance and reduced memory consumption have been a focus for this version, and it also now provides the TableView control. See the Qt 5.12 wiki for an overview of all the new features.

Yabits, a new UEFI Coreboot payload alternative, made its debut last month. According to Phoronix, Yabits "aims to deliver the same UEFI x86_64 booting capabilities as TianoCore but with a much smaller code-base for environments like embedded systems and the cloud". Future plans for Yabits include "ARM support, Secure Boot capabilities, Graphical Output Protocol handling, and the ability to boot Windows".

Manjaro-Illyria 18.0 is coming soon. Appuals reports that eight updates have been released in this past week, including updates to the 4.19-rc6 kernel, NVIDIA 410.57 drivers added, Wine upgraded to 3.17, upstream fixes to Haskell and Python packages, a new "smooth bootup experience", and Deepin and GNOME package updates. In addition, the Manjaro team is also working on the Bladebook Fall 2018, which will run Manjaro KDE 18.0 preinstalled "with the Intel Apollo Lake Quad-Core HD APU, a fanless metal material, and utilize eMMC as its primary storage, although the dev states that additional M2-SSD could be possible." See https://manjaro.org/hardware for more information.

The first DNSSEC root key rollover will happen on October 11, 2018. See the Red Hat Blog post for what you need to know about the rollover.

Users have discovered a secret text adventure game hidden in Google.com. You need to be using Chrome, Firefox or Edge for it to work. See the story on The Verge for details.

News qt Yabits UEFI Manjaro DNSSEC gaming
Jill Franklin

Introducing Genius, the Advanced Scientific Calculator for Linux

1 week 6 days ago
by Joey Bernard

Genius is a calculator program that has both a command-line version and a GNOME GUI version. It should available in your distribution's package management system. For Debian-based distributions, the GUI version and the command-line version are two separate packages. Assuming that you want to install both, you can do so with the following command:

sudo apt-get install genius gnome-genius

If you use Ubuntu, be aware that the package gnome-genius doesn't appear to be in Bionic. It's in earlier versions (trusty, xenial and arty), and it appears to be in the next version (cosmic). I ran into this problem, and thought I'd mention it to save you some aggravation.

Starting the command-line version provides an interpreter that should be familiar to Python or R users.

Figure 1. When you start Genius, you get the version and some license information, and then you'll see the interpreter prompt.

If you start gnome-genius, you'll see a graphical interface that is likely to be more comfortable to new users. For the rest of this article, I'm using the GUI version in order to demonstrate some of the things you can do with Genius.

Figure 2. The GUI interface provides easy menu access to most of the functionality within Genius.

You can use Genius just as a general-purpose calculator, so you can do things like:

genius> 4+5 = 9

Along with basic math operators, you also can use trigonometric functions. This command gives the sine of 45 degrees:

genius> sin(45) = 0.850903524534

These types of calculations can be of essentially arbitrary size. You also can use complex numbers out of the box. Many other standard mathematical functions are available as well, including items like logarithms, statistics, combinatorics and even calculus functions.

Along with functions, Genius also provides control structures like conditionals and looping structures. For example, the following code gives you a basic for loop that prints out the sine of the first 90 degrees:

for i = 1 to 90 do ( x = sin(i); print(x) )

As you can see, the syntax is almost C-like. At first blush, it looks like the semicolon is being used as a line-ending character, but it's actually a command separator. That's why there is a semicolon on the line with the sine function, but there is no semicolon on the line with the print function. This means you could write the for loop as the following:

Go to Full Article
Joey Bernard

Fedora 29 GNOME 3.30 Test Day Tomorrow, Kernel Update for Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch", Jigsaw Introduces Intra App to Prevent Censorship, Russian Subway Dogs Now Available for Linux and AT&T Releases Router Specs to the Open Compute Project

2 weeks ago

News briefs for October 4, 2018.

Tomorrow, October 5, 2018, is a Fedora 29 GNOME 3.30 Test Day. If you're interested in participating, see the wiki page. All you need is Fedora 29 (which you can grab from the wiki), and the event will be held in #fedora-test-day on Freenode IRC.

Debian released a kernel update for Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" that addresses several vulnerabilities. If you haven't done so already, update to version 4.9.110-3+deb9u5. See the security announcement for details. (Source: Softpedia News.)

Jigsaw, a cyber unit division owned by Google's parent company Alphabet, recently introduced Intra, a new app with the goal of protecting users from state-sponsored censorship. According to TechCrunch, Intra "aims to prevent DNS manipulation attacks" and that "by passing all your browsing queries and app traffic through an encrypted connection to a trusted Domain Name Server, Intra says it ensures you can use your app without meddling or get to the right site without interference."

The game Russian Subway Dogs, the "systemic arcade game inspired by the real life stray dogs of the Moscow metro", is getting a content update and also is now supported on Linux. It's available now on Steam, itch.io and Humble Bundle for $14.99 USD, and you can view the trailer here.

AT&T this week is releasing specifications for a cell site gateway router to the Open Compute Project. According to the press release, this "white box" blueprint will allow any hardware maker to build these routers, which will be installed at tens of thousands of cell towers during the next several years. These routers then will "eventually form the infrastructure that will enable not just phones and tablets to connect to our mobile 5G network, but new technologies like autonomous cars, drones, augmented reality and virtual reality systems, smart factories, and more".

News Fedora GNOME kernel Security Debian Privacy censorship gaming AT&T
Jill Franklin